Wednesday, 6 August 2014

I Refuse by Udi Segal (Video)

One brave young Jew who is prepared to stand up for his beliefs in the face of Israeli repression and the ongoing genocide of the Palestinian people.

Watch video below.





Udi Segal, from Kibbutz Tuval in the north, is one of the signatories of the new "letter of conscientious objectors 2014". On Monday (28.7.14) he is about to report to the recruiting center and refuse to join the army. Here is his declaration of refusal.




The Gaza Bombardment - What You're Not Being Told (video)

The corporate media isn't just distorting the facts on the Gaza assault, they're flat out covering them up

Scroll down for video.

PREFACE: To all the people attempting to write us off by calling us antisemitic, go watch this video that we made in October of 2013. In that video we harshly attacked racist and antisemitic elements that have been spreading hate through social media. We then followed that up with several confrontations on Facebook where we made it very clear that these idiots are not welcome in our circle. So drop the stupid ad hominem attacks. I'm not influenced by such childish behavior.

On July 7, 2014 Israel began a massive assault on the Gaza strip of Palestine. In the first week alone Israel dropped over 400 tons of bombs, killing over 130 Palestinians. Most were civilians, about half of them were women and children. By the time you are watching the the number will be higher. Update: The Palestinian death toll as of July 30th, has now passed 1,400. To those of you claiming that this is the fault of the Palestinians, who the Israelis accuse of using human shields, how do you explain the bombing of schools?


Israel's official justification for this wholesale slaughter: the murder of three Israeli teenagers which Israel blames on Hamas. That's not the real reason. First of all Israel has not produced one single piece of evidence implicating Hamas or even a Palestinian in the murders, and in fact the the evidence we do have indicates that that murderers were Israeli. You see on Tuesday July 1st, The Jerusalem Post released the audio of the kidnapped teen's distress call to police, and in that call the kidnappers can be heard telling the boys to put their heads down in HEBREW. According to the Jerusalem Post prior to being leaked to the public this (continue reading)

WATCH VIDEO

Couple who spent 5 years building eco-home allowed to keep it despite no planning permission

A couple who spent five years living in a tent as they built themselves an eco-home have been allowed to keep it, despite not applying for planning permission because it was 'against their principles'.

Matthew Lepley, 34, and his partner Jules Smith, 54, left their home in a north London tower block and moved to the Devon countryside after buying a 20-acre field near Beaworthy.

Dreaming of 'living at one with nature', the couple spent five years sleeping in a tent and living off the land while they constructed a one-bedroom eco-cabin - complete with compost lavatory - from wooden crates, scrap metal and lorry tyres.

The couple, who shunned power tools and did all the work by hand to cut their carbon emissions, refused to apply for planning permission because they said the process wasted paper and used too much energy.


But their dream was left hanging in the balance when neighbours complained the tumbledown timber dwelling was unauthorised.

Mr Lepley and Ms Smith, both of whom were carers before they moved to Devon, were sent an enforcement notice from Torridge District Council ordering them to 'remove' it from their field in Beaworthy, Devon.
But, in a landmark ruling, planners have praised their 'passion' and 'commitment' to sustainable living, and told them the cabin can stay. 

Despite previous cases of people shunning planning laws being prosecuted, the couple has now been granted permission to leave it untouched for at least three years.

Government planning inspector Gareth Symons said the couple's approach 'sits very comfortably' with new rules issued by the National Planning Policy Framework, which encourage builders to use natural materials to minimise waste and carbon emissions.


Mr Symons described their efforts to live a frugal life at one with nature as 'admirable', and said forcing the pair to leave the handmade home could have a 'devastating impact' on them.


He said: 'It would be very difficult to flaw the passion the appellants have to achieve their permaculture aim, a key part of which is living with nature on the land.

'I am convinced about the genuineness and commitment of the appellants. They are not individuals who simply wish to have a house in the countryside.'

The pair run a smallholding on their land which, if it proves financially viable, may entitle them to retrospective planning permission when the three-year stay elapses.

Their utopian dream to escape the rat race began five years ago when they quit their jobs as carers and Wood Green tower block and moved to their newly-acquired 20-acre field.

They made foundations from old tractor tyres filled with gravel, while the walls and roof were built from discarded haulage pallets and railway sleepers.

But their refusal to use power tools meant that it took them five years to construct the small dwelling which boasts one bedroom, a bathroom with woodfire-heated bath, and an underground storage chamber.  It has no electricity, and food is kept underground to keep it cool.

The couple grow their own fruit and vegetables, have a compost heap for a toilet, and draw water out of the ground with a bore hole.

Neighbours were initially supportive of their ambition to live a self-sufficient lifestyle on the remote woodland plot, but when the couple revealed plans to turn their rustic retreat into a conservation business, hosting workshops in green engineering and 'permaculture', locals changed their tune and complained to the local authority.

Mr Lepley said: 'We wanted to build a home that would let us truly live as one with nature.  This life is not for everyone but we love it - it enables us to live a therapeutic lifestyle and be self-sufficient.


'We took the decision to build without planning permission because the council's procedure is not environmentally friendly enough and it goes against our personal principles.'

A separate application for Mr Lepley to pay the council's costs was also dismissed.

Local residents are 'furious' at the decision to let the couple stay in the wooden house. 

One local resident, who asked not to be named, said: 'If that was me, and I built any sort of addition to my house, the council would come down on me like a tonne of bricks. I had to get permission for my conservatory and it took me so long, but I did it. 

'Now this couple get to come along and just build what they want, with the council unwilling to do anything. It's disgusting how some people are treated one way, and others another.'

Another said: 'It is all well and good them building this so called 'green home', but that doesn't mean they should be allowed to do it without permission. 


'There are laws in place for a reason and for them to be completely ignored is unfair on everyone else who has stuck to them over the years.'

For more information and photos, please see source.

Earthlings, Anarchists and Other Animals

In a 1990 photo from the Animal Liberation Front,
two activists posed after removing 82 beagles and
 26 rabbits from a laboratory in Cambridge, England.
I was watching a “60 Minutes” report on YouTube when I realized I could burn down a logging station. The 2005 report, called “BurningRage,” told the story of the environmental extremist group the Earth LiberationFront, which the United States government had come to regard as its greatest domestic “terrorist” threat. At the time, the E.L.F. was responsible for over 1,000 actions, including the most financially destructive act of domestic terrorism ever recorded: One of its autonomous cells had set fire to a $23 million housing development outside San Diego, completely destroying it.

I was watching this because the E.L.F. activist Daniel McGowan had recently signed a plea agreement ending a long trial for setting fire to the offices of Superior Lumber in Glendale, Ore., causing over $400,000 in damage. By temporarily shutting down Superior Lumber’s operations, McGowan and five other activists delayed the untimely deaths of untold numbers of trees and animals whose habitats were being clear-cut. McGowan looked like a hero to me and to others in the movement.

It was 2006 and I was 22. I had been an ethical vegan for only a short time, but was already beginning to learn about organizations like the E.L.F., the Animal Liberation Front (A.L.F.), and Earth First! thinkers like the green-anarchist philosopher John Zerzan, and bands like Gather and Earth Crisis, who made hard-core punk music about animal liberation.Seeing the twisted, charred remains of the San Diego housing development flicker across my computer screen, I thought of all I could do with my own hands, and my anger. I cared passionately about protecting other species and decided to act.

My boyfriend and I began penning a manifesto and planning our own actions, studying manuals for lockpicking and building incendiary devices. The anarchist sites we frequented gave us directions for reproducing zines from PDFs, so we began to distribute them out of my boyfriend’s apartment and called our distro Black Masque. We watched countless videos shot surreptitiously inside vivisection laboratories and slaughterhouses, and read deeply about rewilding and primitivism, talking about how we’d help take down the sick system, then live in a treehouse in the mountains and grow our own food.

Seven years later, I’ve still never carried out an action. My boyfriend and I split up and I moved back home. I got a job in a coffee shop and life took over. Before long, I wasn’t even vegan anymore.

II.

My parents are ethical vegetarians but left it up to me to decide on my own. When I was 10, I did, after finding a PETA pamphlet about animal rights at my friend’s house and bringing it home. I remember the rankling feeling I had after calling the 800 number on my toothpaste tube a few days later and asking a woman if the company tested its toothpaste on animals. I found out it did, but I didn’t stop using it — back then, I didn’t know there were alternatives. Throughout most of middle and high school, I was the vegetarian outlier among my friends. I believed I was special.

By the time I got to college, my lifestyle had become so habitual that I forgot why I wanted to abstain from animal products in the first place. After all that time, I still knew little about the beef industry and its connection to the dairy and leather industries, and nothing about the precarious state of our oceans as a result of overfishing, or the fate of unwanted male chicks unlucky enough to be born on egg farms. My freshman year, I fell in love for the first time, with an Italian-American boy who lived down the hall from me in my dorm. He was an enthusiastic and aggressive meat eater, and after many weeks of his prodding, I relented and ordered a salmon steak at the Macaroni Grill. Since then I have alternated between meat eating and strict, at times militant, veganism.

Currently, I’ve been vegan for over a year, having again made the change after finishing a novel about young lovers getting involved in veganarchist activism. But the passive, day-to-day choices of ethical veganism alone leave me feeling restless.

III.

During the E.L.F.-A.L.F. period, I moved into a new apartment and got a kitten, whom I named Roslyn. I loved her immediately and intensely. Being a young adult of the 21st century, I demonstrated this love with hundreds of pictures on Facebook. All of my friends knew Roslyn and adored her; she even had her own Facebook account after a while. So when my boyfriend, who was already vegan, asked me why I would eat some animals but not others — for instance, Roslyn — the question seemed ridiculous. But thinking about it, I couldn’t give him a good answer.

Now Roslyn lives at my parents’ house in Florida and I live in a tiny apartment in one of the largest urban spaces on the planet.

A large part of the difficulty I’ve had sustaining what I consider to be an ethical lifestyle over the years has been the lack of direct contact I have with animals. Most of the animals I see are either moving about on screens, or already cold cuts — processed food being another kind of screen. Recently, I watched two videos of an orphaned rhino cuddling with its keeper. I commented on a photograph of a baby brown bear on the National Geographic Instagram. I did most of the research for my novel online, where images of suffering animals intermix with those of docile house cats and cows grazing on hillsides.

There’s a documentary, which I’m afraid to watch, called “Earthlings.” The two-and-a-half minute trailer contains so much real footage of graphic violence that I don’t think I can handle two hours of it. Joaquin Phoenix narrates while a cow thrashes around on the floor of a slaughterhouse, bleeding out, and a deer is skinned alive but continues to live. A dog is thrown, struggling, into the back of a garbage truck. One racehorse trips and five more go stumbling over it. At the end of the trailer Phoenix says, “It takes nothing away from a human to be kind to an animal.” Seeing this, I feel a number of emotions: pity, rage, fear, indignation. But I know they’re synthetic. They don’t touch the love from which springs true compassion.

IV.

Sometimes, walking to the subway, I’ll stop to watch finches play on a patch of grass, or a squirrel flick its tail next to a bush. If I’m lucky, I’ll see rats running along the tracks while I wait for my train. But aside from the occasional dog, I never interact with animals. And while I feel more strongly now than I ever have before that being vegan is the most ethical lifestyle choice I can make, I’m also more sensitive to the artifice inherent in my daily understanding of animal life.

My first time grocery shopping after going vegan last summer, I walked down the meat aisle past sausages, ground beef and chicken cutlets, aware that my rediscovered beliefs were, to a large extent, intellectual. It took an imaginary leap for me to recognize the blood pooling in the corner of some Saran Wrap as that which had once carried nourishment to the organs of another being, so I conjured up videos I’d seen of slaughterhouses, battery cages and nursing sows. I reminded myself of all I’d read recently, how disgusted I’d felt just days beforehand. Reaching the end of the aisle, I still felt disconnected. Then I saw the chicken feet.

They’d always been there next to the cow tongues but I’d never seen that they were so humanlike. They were bled white and plump. Their four digits bent innocently at the knuckles like children’s. Skin was torn where it was handled too roughly, and snapped tendons showed from the ends of wrists beneath ragged skin where the feet had been chopped. Fingernails came to elegant points. I got close and stared. What had been theoretical just seconds before had suddenly become disturbingly, gloriously real to me.

V.

Growing up by the water in Florida, I spent a lot of time interacting with wildlife: stingrays, pelicans, mangroves, lizards, orange trees, hibiscus and any number of sea birds and tropical bugs. My husband and I flew down recently to visit my parents and I took him to an estuary where I used to spend my free time. We stood silently at the edge of a tide pool, and after some minutes, fiddler crabs crept from the mud, first one at a time, and then by the dozens. They scuttled around our feet making gentle waves, unaware that we watched from above.

It is one of my life’s great regrets that I haven’t done more to defend other species against human greed. Whether fatigue or complacency, finding excuses is easy. A lack of time and money is the first. Then comes the blame: I don’t have money because capitalism doesn’t work; this is how the system’s designed; it doesn’t allow you to resist. Then the defeat: We’ve already lost; the earth is doomed; I’m doing all I can day to day.
Deep down, I know that I’m not.


Recently, The Associated Press reported that the earth is standing at the precipice of a sixth mass extinction as a result of disappearing habitats. When I read things like this, my rage is ignited as it was nearly a decade ago. I wonder all over again: Who is injured when a logging station or a slaughterhouse burns? Who is injured when it doesn’t? When we talk about animals, we are also talking about humans. But anger alone will get us nowhere, and violence will get us nowhere. As if grieving, we have to learn to endure, making conscious choices, every day, which help us to live.

Saturday, 15 February 2014

24-year-old Russian spends eight months living in the freezing Russian wilderness

Scroll down for video

A Russian man is taking the chance to escape the rat race to the extreme - by living like a 10th century hermit in the snow-covered forests of Russia. Pavel Sapozhnikov, 24, from Moscow will spend a total of eight months living like his ancestors did on a replica of an ancient farm as part of a social experiment. He is only allowed to leave the fenced-off area of the farm to hunt and gather food, is banned from any kind of communication, and can only use authentic tools from ancient Russia. 

The farm is situated in a forest clearing around 50 miles north of the Russian capital.
It features a house, a well, hayloft and smokehouse, plus a separate toilet, and bread oven. Sapozhnikov additionally has pens for chickens and goats.

[Left] Sapozhnikov's farm is situated in a forest clearing around 50 miles north of Moscow. It features pens for chickens, pictured, as well as goats. Chickens are used for eggs and meat, while the goats are used for milk

The experiment is part of a project called ‘Hero’ and was set up by events manager Alexei Ovcharenko from agency Ratobor.

The theory behind the experiment is ‘to trace the social and psychological changes in personality and learn how important the support of others is to modern humans.’

[Left] With help from expert archaeologist, Alexander Fetisov, the farm was built using only materials and techniques that would have been used by ancient Russians. This includes fire lights that burn on linseed oil, wooden beds, animal fur clothes and bedding, pictured, and a calendar scratched into the wall of the house

With help from expert archaeologist, Alexander Fetisov, the farm was built using only materials and techniques that would have been used by ancient Russians. 

Sapozhnikov must also furnish his home in the same way.

[Left] Construction of the farm, shown in this illustration, began at the start of 2012, and Sapozhnikov moved in at the start of September 2013. The fenced-off farm features a house, a well, hayloft and smokehouse, plus a separate toilet. There is also a bread oven and a bath

This includes fire lights that burn on linseed oil, wooden beds, animal fur clothes and bedding and a calendar scratched into the wall of the house. 

Construction on the farm began at the start of 2012, and Sapozhnikov moved in at the start of September 2013; the project is expected to run until May. 
[Left] Sapozhnikov spends the morning milking his goats, preparing his chickens, pictured left, and eating breakfast. He then chops wood for the fire, right, and collects water from the well. The rest of the day is spent either hunting for food, or carrying out manual labour on the farm, including insulating the house with manure

During this time, temperatures in the region can drop as low as minus 30°C and this time period was deliberately chosen to highlight exactly how difficult Russian ancestors would have found living and hunting in the conditions.

Ovcharenko added that eight months is long enough for the experiment to yield results, but not too long that it will 'pathologically endanger' Sapozhnikov.

[Left] To produce hot water, Sapozhnikov places stones in his fire stove, before putting these stones into a bucket of cold water, pictured. He then uses this water to wash his clothes, cooking utensils and himself

At the start of the project, Sapozhnikov was given the chance to document a day in the life on the farm, using a camera and notepad, and this was posted on the project’s blog. 

[Left] As part of the project, Sapozhnikov, pictured, is only allowed to leave the fenced off area to hunt and gather food. He was given a small amount of harvested food, as well as chickens, pictured, at the beginning of the project, but this supply was not designed to last the length of the experiment

According to this blog, Sapozhnikov spends the morning milking his goats, preparing his chickens, collecting eggs and eating breakfast, he then chops wood for the fire and collects water from the well. 

[Left] To prepare for the mission, Sapozhnikov spent months learning how to prepare animals, including chickens, pictured. He also became skilled in using ancient tools and familiarised himself with ancient fire-building and washing techniques, with help from archaeologists

The rest of the day is spent either hunting for food, or carrying out manual labour on the farm. This includes insulating the house with manure. 

[Left] During winter, temperatures in the region can drop as low as 30°C and snow covers the ground for months. This time period and was deliberately chosen to highlight exactly how difficult Russian ancestors would have found living, and hunting, in these conditions, pictured

As part of the project, Sapozhnikov is only allowed to leave the fenced off area to hunt and gather food.

[Left] How the farm house looks at night. The experiment is part of a project called 'Hero' and was set up by events manager Alexei Ovcharenko from agency Ratobor. The theory behind the experiment is 'to trace the social and psychological changes in personality and learn how important the support of others is to modern humans'

He was given a small amount of harvested food at the beginning of the project, but this supply was not designed to last the length of the experiment. 

[Left] The only way Sapozhnikov, pictured, can abandon the project is if his mental or physical health is at serious risk, or his life is under threat. However, if he contracts a common illness, such as a cold, or even diseases, such as a lung infection, Sapozhnikov will be required to carry on - as his ancestors would have done

Sapozhnikov is banned from any form of communication, except during open days, once a month, when a medical expert and project leader visit him and check on his progress. 

[Left] The farm is situated in a forest clearing around 50 miles north of Sapozhnikov's home in Moscow (pictured bottom centre) - although the precise location has not been revealed to protect the experiment from external interference

Even when hunting, Sapozhnikov is forbidden from communicating with anyone he encounters. 

The only way Sapozhnikov can abandon the project is if his mental or physical health is at serious risk, or his life is under threat. 

[Left] Sapozhnikov tracks how long he has been on the farm using a make-shift calendar scratched into the wall of the house, pictured

However, if he contracts a common illness, such as a cold, or other diseases, such as a lung infection, Sapozhnikov will be required to carry on - as his ancestors would have done. 

Sapozhnikov became a festival volunteer with Ratobor in 2010 and from May to September that year, he lived in a reconstruction of an ancient settlement, dubbed ‘beta’ for the current experiment. 

He is single and was previously a student at Moscow University.

To prepare for the mission, Sapozhnikov spent months learning how to prepare animals, including chickens. 

He also became skilled in using ancient tools and familiarised himself with ancient fire-building and washing techniques. 

For example, to produce hot water, Sapozhnikov places stones in his fire stove until they are glowing, before putting these stones into a bucket of cold water. 

He then uses this water to wash his clothes, cooking utensils, his home, and his body - although because water is scarce, clothes and body washing is carried out 'infrequently.'

Ratobor was set up in 2006 and has completed similar events based on historical experiences. 

A DAY IN THE LIFE OF THE ANCIENT RUSSIAN HERMIT 

At the start of the project, Pavel Sapozhnikov was given the chance to document a day in the life using a camera and notepad, and this was posted on the project’s blog. 

According to this blog, Sapozhnikov spends the morning milking his goats and eating breakfast.

He then chops wood for the fire and collects water from the well. 

The rest of the day is spent either hunting for food, or carrying out manual labour on the farm. 

This includes insulating the house with manure, maintaining his house and outbuildings, and other tasks around the farm.

To prepare for the mission, Sapozhnikov spent months learning how to prepare animals, including chickens. 

He also became skilled in using the ancient tools and familiarised himself with ancient fire-building and washing techniques.

He is only allowed to leave the farm to find food, and is forbidden from any form of communication.
 

(Source)

Wednesday, 29 January 2014

A Critique of Marxism

Marxism is a dogma which believes that it can make the entire human and social life into a science. Marxism would be an absolute mechanical causality, in which every cause becomes an operation and each operation becomes a cause. It pretends to know the future, to make provisions on the conditions of human development, however for us it represents a ridiculous failure to recognize the boundaries of science. By no means can we deny science, but subjective as science is, it can merely be an estimate which depends on the personality it carries within itself.

Perhaps the most ridiculous assumption of Marxism is that capitalist facts can have socialist consequences. The idea that capitalism and the misery that goes with it, are just many stages towards socialism, is a scientific delusion. Socialism cannot result from capitalism, but can only grow against it from a sense of injustice and a desire for togetherness. In contradiction to Marx’s claim that socialism is only a product of workers materialism, mankind comes to socialism from very different motives. Socialism can only be the fruit of numerous small changes. If one would wait for a certain “degree of ripeness” of capitalism, the degree of degeneration of the masses will make the achievement of socialism simply impossible.

Because Marxism claims to know the future with certainty, on the grounds of “immutable” laws of historical development, it suggests that the will and deeds of people can not stop this development. The Marxists see themselves as a necessary link in the chain of development. They represent themselves as the bearers and discoverers of social development. Therefore the Marxist dogma feeds the haughty self-righteousness, which leads to the denial that also other socialist views can be part of the truth. Socialists who come to socialism by other ways then the Marxist dogma, are considered as “second-class” socialists. Or even worse, these “second-class” socialist counteract against the “inevitable” development, thus they are “reactionary”.

Marxism one-sidedly focuses on technical-economic factors and greatly underestimates the role that the socialist mindset plays. The socialist spirit is a desire for connectedness and the will to put it into action: that’s the foremost condition for socialism. The development of capitalism doesn’t just lead towards more physical and material misery, but also leads to an increasing mindlessness and hopelessness among the people. The whole of humanity faces the danger of overall decline. Therefore every day is precious; there is no time to lose, because it’s about human life itself. One can not wait until capitalism reaches a certain stadium, one has to act now.

The achievement of socialism begins with the initiative of singletons and small groups. Each activity they oppose to capitalism, is worthy of the name socialism. Liberation is only there for those who can free themselves from capitalism and who start “becoming human” again. “Becoming human” means that one no longer works for profit alone, but for real human needs. The pioneering work of these loners and small groups, will in turn inspire others to follow their example and people will work in community. This community can never arise from a command from above, but can only arise from the basis by a change in the labor relations, the lifestyle, habits and ethics. If one wants to destroy capitalism, one first has to destroy the worldview that it carries within itself.

In contradiction to Marxism, which views socialism as a system that originates from the womb of capitalism, we see socialism as a new beginning that is opposite of capitalism. Socialism represents a return to the natural human relations, a return to the spirit of togetherness that connects man with his community. Socialism represents the return to the old community man, that lives on the blood of each and every modern individualist. 

----------------------------------------------------

OFFICIAL LINKS
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Movement Central Group (N-AM)
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Book Club
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Earth & Animal Activism Network
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Permaculture Information Network
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Survivalist and Preparedness Circle
* Facebook: National-Anarchist France
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Spain
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Italy
* Contacts: Other N-AM Links





Sunday, 26 January 2014

Anarchy As Spiritual Practice (Video)

An excellent speech from Jamie O'Hara of the National-Anarchist Tribal Alliance of New York (NATA-NY).

Family shuns supermarkets and saves £900 a year switching to local markets

The Experiment began before the birth of their daughter Lizzie. Over the year they have saved £900 and say their diet is better. Now they plan to stay supermarket-free forever.

Faced with the birth of their first child, Ian and Rebekah Pugh decided they needed to tighten their belts.
Realising that supermarkets were costing them a small fortune, they set themselves the challenge of shunning them for a year.

Sticking to ten strict rules, the couple limited their food budget to £50 a week and began buying all their groceries from local shops and markets.

A year later, they have not only completed their challenge, they have saved themselves £895.23 – and are reaping the benefits of a healthier lifestyle.

It has been such a success the couple, who live in Faringdon, Oxfordshire, with 18-month-old daughter Elizabeth, have now decided to give up supermarkets for good. 

Mrs Pugh, 29, said: ‘I used to think we spent £50 on the weekly supermarket shop. But when I looked at the bank statements it was more like £90.

‘The trouble is you do the weekly shop then end up popping in to get bread and milk one day and come out with a load of other stuff you hadn’t planned on getting because you see all the two-for-ones and special offers as you go round.

‘You see things for £1 and think that’s really cheap, but if you stopped to think about it you don’t really need them. Supermarkets are engineered to make you buy. That’s why the bread and milk is at the back. 

‘You can definitely buy certain things cheaper in supermarkets. But it’s the lifestyle change which has made the savings – we’re not buying food or products any more, but ingredients, and the amount of them we need, to make things. 

‘We used to waste a lot of things we couldn’t get through.

‘Now we don’t have to buy large quantities of things because that’s how they come packaged. I have the time to cook from scratch every day and we make the most of everything we buy. 

‘For example, we buy a quality chicken from the butcher which we will roast, then have cold in sandwiches and use the  carcass to make stock or soup.’

The Pughs’ ten rules include the opportunity to eat out in a restaurant once a fortnight and the need to avoid wasting any food or drink.   

They shop at a local street market and monthly farmer’s market. They use the local butcher’s, delicatessen and cheese shop and have even started getting their pork straight from a nearby farm. 

They have also begun making their own bread and get their eggs from their hens Tom, Dick and Harry.

If for any reason, they failed to stick to their £50 budget, the couple slashed the following week’s budget by half.

Mr Pugh, 28, an academic administrator at St Cross College at the University of Oxford, has had to give up his favourite biscuits, but his sweet tooth is now more than satisfied by his wife’s home-made cakes.

Mrs Pugh, who blogged about her ‘Year Without Supermarkets’ during her maternity leave from her job as a mental health worker, said: ‘We are healthier as we have lost weight, and we really appreciate things we used to take for granted like golden syrup, which is ridiculously cheap in supermarkets compared to elsewhere.

‘We think a lot more about what we’re eating too. If you fry a bit of supermarket bacon it usually shrivels away and there’s a lot of water. 

‘Ours isn’t like that any more –  we know where it comes from and that the pigs have been cared for. We meet the traders and hear about their products. It’s all an added bonus.’ 

She added: ‘It’s been a good discipline to learn to live this way. We’ve been under our £50 a week food budget – on average we spend about £35. 

'I used to keep the cupboard rammed full as if we were expecting a nuclear disaster. Now I just get in what we need. 

'We’re eating better quality food, certainly more fruit and vegetables. Lizzie has never had any preserved or processed food. It’s all been home-made.

‘Our diet is also more varied. We buy vegetables in season and meat like pheasant and venison which before we’d have associated with paying for in a restaurant.’

(Source)

----------------------------------------------------

OFFICIAL LINKS
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Movement Central Group (N-AM)
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Book Club
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Earth & Animal Activism Network
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Permaculture Information Network
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Survivalist and Preparedness Circle
* Facebook: National-Anarchist France
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Spanish Speaking Resistance 
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Italy
* Contacts: Other N-AM Links


Gustav Landauer: His Folkanarchism

Gustav Landauer (1870-1919) was a German anarchist during the German November revolution. On the 2nd of May 1919 he died a martyrs death, during the fall of the Soviet republic. His anarcho-socialist ideas can definitely be seen as a solid basis for what we today describe as “folkanarchism”. Landauer is best described as a critical and realistic idealist. He was not deceived by idealist mirages, nor by materialist fallacies.


Folk and Culture

In contradiction to most socialists from his time, Landauer never believed that humanity would reach a higher phase of life by the development of technology and science. He didn't count on the idea that “progress” would be mechanically achieved, but by an eternal rejuvenation and renewal. The peoples never aged, only their cultures did. At a certain time each culture irrevocably lost its life force, through which it froze and fell. Because of this the peoples who were once its bearers fell into a state of “serenity” and forgot that what they had wanted, known and done, until finally the day came that they were regenerated by a new idea.

When this new idea appeared between them as a real unchanging truth, then the individuals were bound again through worship and love. Through this, human life became lifted to higher forms of organisation and a new culture flourished. In these times the urge to connect with the people got the upper hand and the power over the individual. With this a form of social life came to being that was described by Landauer as “the community of communities”; the organic connection of little, self-governing and, on their own strength acting units, that in turn connected themselves with larger units. This age of great culture was marked by the new idea feeding the “stream of life”, only then the relationships were healthy and life had dignity.

This era was always preceded by a stage in which the spirit of the community dominates. In this stage no brilliant personalities rise above the masses, because the essence of life is uniform. Brilliant personalities come forth from the bosom of the community and the general spirit of the people themselves, therefore the people does not gawk at them as “wondrous animals”, but recognize them as natural fruits from the tree of society. These highlights are rarely reached in humanity its rich and infinitely long history. During these highlights there is no need for an ideal, no craving for the new, because the spirit that gives meaning to life, is present in all its manifestations.

After these era’s of balance, inexorably follows times of demise. The negative forces that are present within each culture, are rigid dogmas, which prevail over the living spirit. The living spirit is killed by them, because people are clinging to one and the same dogmatic form. Organisations, like the State, have contained since their existence the seeds of domination and mechanically rigid centralism. Through the advance of the general decay their bad sides have gotten worse, while they grow in strength. In the masses, the spirit that binds all individuals into a true community, disappears. When the life of the community no longer feeds the individual, the individual gets alienated and lonely. This process of sophisticated individualization on the one hand, and atomization on the other, leads towards a mindlessness of the masses. They can only become a people again, when a new culture flourishes.

Progress and Revolution

In contradiction to most revolutionary Marxists, Landauer unconditionally rejected the “Zeitgeist”. Fierce anti-capitalists like Vladimir Lenin, Rosa Luxemburg and Karl Liebknecht accepted the growth of the big-industrial organisation and saw the associated mechanization as “progress” in the spirit of Marx. Their “progress” was nothing more than the “progress” of the bourgeoisie. Landauer´s thought was not based on the historical materialism, which makes the development of technology as the criterion of progress. He didn't see the development of Western humanity since the Renaissance as an unparalleled triumph. Landauer had his own criteria for progress. He didn't see progress in materialist terms, but measured life by the content in which people became aware of their connectedness. The modern Zeitgeist he acknowledged as an era of cultural descent, of increasing alienation and upheaval.

However Landauer didn’t believe in the “eternal damnation” of a people. He saw change through renewal as a law of life. Through demise, growth could be born and from despair new strength could derive. There was only one spirit that could rise the people again: the spirit of justice in community life. Landauer didn’t only see his socialism as the only opportunity to escape the need and social misery of the proletariat, but also as the only opportunity for the renewal of the entire humanity. Only this could stop its demise and alienation.

Landauer considered the revolution as a constantly recurring phenomenon, through which society could escape from the danger of cultural rigidity. Since the Western culture perished, the West mostly survived through violence and centralized State power. During this period the Western humanity also strove for freedom, which was strongly expressed during the revolution. Therefore Landauer considered the revolution as the run-up towards spiritual rebirth. The urge to live, which was suffocated during normal times, was released during revolutionary days.

Although Landauer was convinced of the regenerative function of the revolution, he didn’t see it as the way towards socialism. According to him the great force of socialism was construction: the peaceful reconstruction. When the revolution had destroyed the old strongholds and obsolete forms of life, then her positive forces were enough to ensure the existence and further development of the community.

Landauer’s views on socialism were realistic-idealistic. Realistic was his view that the urge for socialism arose from social relations and the impossibility to which capitalism led us. His view was idealistic because he was convinced that next to these social conditions, another force of a completely different order was needed before socialism could be born: the creative spirit which could produce new relationships between mankind. For Landauer socialism was not absolute. The natural feeling of fraternity between fellow countrymen and fellow human beings he acknowledged, as the active force that gave meaning to life and to the world. Socialism was not build on a certain modus of production or a certain technology, but on a deep and noble urge within human nature: social instincts and social feelings.

This is the socialism Landauer fought for many years of his life and for which he eventually died a martyrs death.

----------------------------------------------------

OFFICIAL LINKS
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Movement Central Group (N-AM)
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Book Club
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Earth & Animal Activism Network
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Permaculture Information Network
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Survivalist and Preparedness Circle
* Facebook: National-Anarchist France
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Spanish Speaking Resistance 
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Italy
* Contacts: Other N-AM Links


Why We Are Pagans

What do we see in paganism? Why are we inspired by the age old traditions of the ancient Germanic peoples? In this article we will shortly try to explain this. Germanic paganism offers us a complete cosmography which includes all aspects of human life. However it´s not a rigid dogma, but a worldview that gets shape through a number of norms, values and ethics. These are narrated by the Edda; the only written account about Germanic Paganism. In the Edda we find a collection of mythical and heroic verses from the 10th century, in which the world as the Germanic tribes viewed them was described.

At the foundation of this germanic ethics lies human action; the eternal wisdom that the power over life is in our own hands. In contradiction to modern monotheist religions such as Christianity, it does not promise a beautiful and perfect hereafter after an empty and disconsolate life, but propagates man as the master of his own soul. in essence Germanic paganism calls for embracing felicity in the here and now. As a consequence of our own actions, we take the happiness which we realize and earn in this life with us to the afterlife. Germanic paganism emphasizes our personal responsibility in the here and now. This Germanic ethics are clearly expressed in “The words of the Exalted” (Hávamál) in the Edda. In these collected verses we find wisdom and advice for human relations.

Some pagans blame us that we are involved in politics. But how can we separate this from a cosmography that provides us guidelines for all aspects of human life? Germanic paganism, provides us with a clear political alternative. It teaches us that people are no passive sheep who have to blindly follow the ruling class, but that they have to and can make their own choices. This was also expressed by the political organisation of the Germanic tribes, where noble leaders only existed by the grace of the people and where any Teuton had a democratic participation in “the Thing” which was directed by the Druids. All this was described in detail in Tacitus his book “Germania”. Paganism does not offer us a god to blame for our imperfections, the pagan gods teach us to live our own lives by example, as recorded in the Edda. They teach us that only values such as honour, loyalty, courage and justice can provide us with happiness and prosperity. Noble values that sadly seem to have entirely dissappeared in this modern world.

In a world plagued by an unprecedented environmental pollution and in which nature is destroyed by modern man in a pace that the world has never seen before, paganism also provides us with clear guidelines for a responsible interaction with the environment and the ecosystem. In Germanic paganism nature is a holistic reality: it´s a structure of interconnected worlds woven around each other, intertwined, and responding to each other. Paganism is the worship of nature and all living things, it disapproves greed and suggests modesty in all aspects of life. Germanic culture was immersed in the different natural patrons which determine daily life. It was the recognition of these foundations that drew attention to the gods and the powers they possessed. Germanic paganism teaches us that we have an ancient and enduring relationship with the natural world that surrounds us.

Therefore Germanic paganism does not represent a long lost past, nor a trendy new age cult for us, but an ancestral wisdom and ancient tradition that offers us a clear guideline for contemporary life. We are not longing for a return to a mythical and romantic past, we are progressive, we want to go forward. However with Germanic paganism we are able to fill the spiritual emptiness of our modern time and reclaim our heritage for revolutionary goals. It promotes a world in which the community and family are central and in which every individual is able to think, choose and act for himself. It offers us the revolutionary worldview that we need in the social emptiness of the 21st century. It teaches us that only through the community we can rebuild all that has value and that it´s only by the community that we can redetermine what is “good” and “evil”. A look at our pagan past, gives us a look at an alternate future.

In this age of globalisation and alienation the people have in many ways been cut off from its ancestral wisdom. Only by reclaiming this legacy and by reinstating it, can we open the path towards a better, more exalted and more fulfilling life. This heritage offers us an alternative cosmography, liberated from the oppressive dogmatism and moral relativism of our modern age. Germanic paganism leads us the way to healthy balance between authoritarian rules and uncontrolled chaos, between individualism and collectivism; it provides us with a good guideline for the realisation of a truly free, peaceful and harmonious society. Being pagan means being in contact with the world around you. With a sense of meaning and community it offers an answer to the disillusionment of a monotone globalized world.

Although Germanic paganism knows a strong particularistic element, it also knows an universalist element. In different forms, but substantially in the same essence, we find the wisdom of Germanic paganism back in all nature religions the world has known and still knows. The great migrations have spread the pagan language, religion and mythology from Northern Europe to Southern Asia. Also the Greek Homerus and the Roman mythology that later on developed from it, show clear parallels with Germanic paganism. Also with other nature religions, like those of the native tribes in parts of Asia and South-America, who have maintained their primitive style of living until today, we see strong resemblance with the Germanic faith. This is because all these nature religions have in common that they find their inspiration and might in the elemental forces of nature. All are based on the metaphysical reality that nature offers us. And so the diversity of peoples and cultures on this world all know their own ancestral source, in which the basic wisdoms needed for a life in harmony with nature is conserved. Only by learning from our distant past, we can secure an alternate future for ourselves and for humanity.
----------------------------------------------------

OFFICIAL LINKS
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Movement Central Group (N-AM)
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Book Club
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Earth & Animal Activism Network
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Permaculture Information Network
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Survivalist and Preparedness Circle
* Facebook: National-Anarchist France
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Spanish Speaking Resistance 
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Italy
* Contacts: Other N-AM Links

Saturday, 21 December 2013

The Revolution Begins Here!

The revolution will not happen on a particular date, far off into the future, it begins right here and now with the simple things that affect us every day. Teaching your own children, establishing your own currencies, building your own houses, growing your own food and networking with others of like-mind. Join us.





Facebook:

Contacts:

Other N-AM Links

Publications:

N-AM Publications

Flags:

N-AM Flags

International:

N-AM International Gallery

MANIFESTO

N-AM Manifesto

Interviews

N-AM Interviews 

Fliers and Leaflets

N-AM Resources

Recommended Reading / Listening

Articles to read and audio to listen to

Anarchist Economics

Economics





 







National-Anarchist in Spain donate food, blankets and toys to sheltered dogs.

National-Anarchists in Spain have visited the Alcalá de Henares (APAP-Alcalá) animal/plant shelter and donated food, blankets and toys for the dogs that are housed in the facility. 











Acción de donación de comida y material a protectora. 

En la mañana de este Sábado, militantes nacional anarquistas de la sección española, nos hemos presentado en los terrenos y albergue que la protectora de animales y plantas de Alcalá de henares (APAP-Alcalá) tienen en la población de Olmeda de las fuentes, en donde hemos llevado a cabo una donación de comida y distintos materiales para los perros tales como mantas, juguetes o abrigos. Tras presentarnos y hacer la donación, hemos paseado por las instalaciones y conocido la forma en que viven los animales, hemos estado con ellos, y hemos conocido igualmente el gran trabajo que desarrollan los voluntarios ayudandoles. La fecha de esta acción, siendo mediados de Diciembre, no ha sido elegida fruto de la casualidad, sino con motivo de las inminentes fiestas navideñas y regalos de reyes, y por ello, además de la donación,para lanzar con esta acción, un llamamiento a la conciencia de la adopción frente a la compra,a que las familias no vuelvan a caer en el garrafal error consumista del "capricho del niño" (y abandono en verano) y lanzar el mensaje de que estos animales son seres vivos que tienen unas necesidades especiales, que lo que necesitan son el calor de los hogares,que no son objetos materiales ni mucho menos de consumo para "regalar por reyes", por todo ello ya sabes...¡No compres, adopta!. La dirección web de la protectora alcalaína (información para hacer socio, ser voluntario y adoptar) es http://www.apap-alcala.org

Parte del material y alimentación entregado e instalaciones de la protectora visitadas por los militantes. 
  (Source)

----------------------------------------------------

OFFICIAL LINKS
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Movement Central Group (N-AM)
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Book Club
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Earth & Animal Activism Network
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Permaculture Information Network
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Survivalist and Preparedness Circle
* Facebook: National-Anarchist France
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Spanish Speaking Resistance
* Contacts: Other N-AM Links




Amazing Photos Reveal the World of People Living Outside the System

National Geographic photographer Eric Valli typically pays his bills by working for the likes of Hermes and Vuitton. But the most stunning photos he’s taken are far from the mainstream. In a series called ‘Off the Grid’, Valli documented individuals around the world that are living in the wilderness and out of the system. From a group of autonomous nomads to a lone hermit immersed in a forest, Valli has captured a world that some of us might dream of, but don’t dare to live in (just yet). 

Eric Valli takes amazing pictures of outcast and autonomous people disconnected from the system. His job has taken him around to some of the world’s most remote places giving him the opportunity to peek into the lives of different communities around Thailand, Tibet, Nepal and the US. He documents the way people still live; a life without technology, fashion, supermarkets, Facebook, brands or logos.

These people have resigned from modernity and now live a frugal, lighter life, choosing not to be a part of problem anymore. Rather, they hunt or grow their own food to survive.

We are not sure if these beautiful images are staged or not, but what matters is that they hint at how people can live in complete harmony with nature, leaving everything else behind.
 












----------------------------------------------------

OFFICIAL LINKS
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Movement Central Group (N-AM)
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Book Club
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Earth & Animal Activism Network
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Permaculture Information Network
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Survivalist and Preparedness Circle
* Facebook: National-Anarchist France
* Facebook: National-Anarchist Spanish Speaking Resistance
* Contacts: Other N-AM Links